igic.org

ALL,

IGIC's Nucleus "Indiana GIS News" Blog has been retired, but all HISTORIC blog posts are still available and searchable. All NEW Blog Posts are now created and managed directly to our WordPress Web site. (See IGIC Blogs, IndianaMap Workgroup Blogs, and Committee Blogs) sections on the right side of the footer on each igic.org web page.
Posted From: Indianapolis Star, July 9, 2014

A transportation panel presented a 73-page report to Gov. Mike Pence, which included a roadmap for furthering Indiana’s reputation as a crossroads state. The governor said the report “exceeded my expectations” and will be shared with state agencies for them to study and possibly incorporate into official state transportation planning.
Read the full Indianapolis Star story HERE
You can also download a copy of the full 73-page report HERE
Story Contributed By: Jim Sparks
Indiana Geographic Information Officer
Indiana Office of Technology

100 North Senate Ave.
N551 Government Center North
Indianapolis, IN 46204
Office: (317) 234-5889
Cell: (317) 560-9033
gio@iot.in.gov
www.in.gov/gis

During last week’s annual Indiana GIS conference, I shared a few thoughts about changes that I feel are going to have a significant impact on what we do as GIS practitioners and how we do it. Specifically, I mentioned three areas that we need to give special attention: open government data, data visualization / business intelligence software, and community resiliency.

Open Government Data
I read the following in today’s InformationWeek Daily newsletter related to new open data efforts. It is worth a read. Notice the specific references to geospatial data.
White House Issues Open Data Action Plan
Agencies must incorporate feedback from users to prioritize efforts and improve data as part of G7 Open Data Charter pledge.
The Obama administration has issued a new US Open Data Action Plan calling for agencies to solicit feedback from government data users to improve the quality of government data and prioritize its release to the public.

The 20-page document, released May 9, builds on a pledge made by US officials at a June 18, 2013, international Open Data Charter meeting of G7 leaders to publish a roadmap for improving the availability and use of government data for the public.

Data Visualization/Business Intelligence Software
And this was in yesterday’s GIS Café Newsletter: Putting Business Intelligence on the Map

Business Intelligence (BI) and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) has been fusing over the last couple of years. Why are we seeing this fusion and, perhaps more importantly, why is this something beneficial to analysts? The simple answer is that data displayed using map visualization, when compared to basic charts, is visually more powerful.

Did you know that over 80% of business data has some kind of location component? It’s no wonder why Cognos, MicroStrategy, Business Objects and Information Builders have invested in mapping technology, specifically Esri’s mapping technology, to integrate location analytics seamlessly into their solutions. Even SAS and Tableau have built integration points in their products that can consume and produce geospatial intelligence. So what’s the point? The point is that when 80% of all your data has some kind of location component, it makes sense to visualize the data geospatially.

Community Resiliency
Finally, to round things out, here is a snapshot of recent natural disasters by state to underscore why “community resiliency” will be our new mantra. These FEMA Disaster Declarations were collected by Bill Burgess, Washington Liaison, National States Geographic Information Council. Notice that all of these incidents happened in the last six months.

Florida Severe Storms, Tornadoes, Straight-line Winds, and Flooding (DR-4177)
Incident period: April 28, 2014 to May 6, 2014
Major Disaster Declaration declared on May 6, 2014

Alabama Severe Storms, Tornadoes, Straight-line Winds, and Flooding (DR-4176)
Incident period: April 28, 2014 to May 5, 2014
Major Disaster Declaration declared on May 2, 2014

Mississippi Severe Storms, Tornadoes, and Flooding (DR-4175)
Incident period: April 28, 2014 to May 3, 2014
Major Disaster Declaration declared on April 30, 2014

Arkansas Severe Storms, Tornadoes, and Flooding (DR-4174)
Incident period: April 27, 2014 to April 27, 2014
Major Disaster Declaration declared on April 29, 2014

Indiana Indiana Severe Winter Storm and Snowstorm (DR-4173)
Incident period: January 5, 2014 to January 9, 2014
Major Disaster Declaration declared on April 22, 2014

Montana Ice Jams and Flooding (DR-4172)
Incident period: March 1, 2014 to March 16, 2014
Major Disaster Declaration declared on April 17, 2014

Tennessee Severe Winter Storm (DR-4171)
Incident period: March 2, 2014 to March 4, 2014
Major Disaster Declaration declared on April 11, 2014

Maryland Snow Storm (DR-4170)
Incident period: February 12, 2014 to February 13, 2014
Major Disaster Declaration declared on April 10, 2014

Oregon Severe Winter Storm (DR-4169)
Incident period: February 6, 2014 to February 10, 2014
Major Disaster Declaration declared on April 4, 2014

Washington Flooding and Mudslides (DR-4168)
Incident period: March 22, 2014 to April 28, 2014
Major Disaster Declaration declared on April 2, 2014

North Carolina Severe Winter Storm (DR-4167)
Incident period: March 6, 2014 to March 7, 2014
Major Disaster Declaration declared on March 31, 2014

Washington Flooding and Mudslides (EM-3370)
Incident period: March 22, 2014 to April 28, 2014
Emergency Declaration declared on March 24, 2014

South Carolina Severe Winter Storm (DR-4166)
Incident period: February 10, 2014 to February 14, 2014
Major Disaster Declaration declared on March 12, 2014

Georgia Severe Winter Storm (DR-4165)
Incident period: February 10, 2014 to February 14, 2014
Major Disaster Declaration declared on March 6, 2014

South Carolina Severe Winter Storm (EM-3369)
Incident period: February 10, 2014 to February 19, 2014
Emergency Declaration declared on February 12, 2014

Georgia Severe Winter Storm (EM-3368)
Incident period: February 10, 2014 to February 14, 2014
Emergency Declaration declared on February 11, 2014

Pennsylvania Severe Winter Storm (EM-3367)
Incident period: February 4, 2014 to February 20, 2014
Emergency Declaration declared on February 6, 2014

Oklahoma Severe Winter Storm (DR-4164)
Incident period: December 5, 2013 to December 6, 2013
Major Disaster Declaration declared on January 30, 2014

Vermont Severe Winter Storms (DR-4163)
Incident period: December 20, 2013 to December 26, 2013
Major Disaster Declaration declared on January 29, 2014
WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. – A powerful Web-based system enabling people worldwide to better predict such things as damaging floods and potential effects of climate change is the goal of a $4.5 million, four-year project begun by Purdue University researchers. To read the full Press Release click HERE

merwade-flooding.jpg

This is a satellite image of flooding on the Wabash River between Lafayette and West Lafayette, Ind., in 2013. Shown are variations in the wavelengths of light reflected from the surface to highlight the extent of water and features such as vegetation and bare ground. The last version represents a grouping of the data into various land cover classes. (Information Technology at Purdue image)
Visual-Spatial.jpg
Exceptional spatial ability at age 13 predicts creative and scholarly achievements more than 30 years later, according to results from a Vanderbilt University longitudinal study... To learn more Click Here.
Contributed By: John C. Steinmetz, PhD
Director and State Geologist

Indiana Geological Survey
Indiana University, Bloomington
812.855.5067
http://igs.indiana.edu

In so doing, Governor Pence recognizes the fundamental importance of the Earth Sciences to our society: finding, developing, and conserving mineral, energy, and water resources; providing an understanding and awareness of natural geologic hazards and mitigating their effects; recognizing the importance of the Earth Sciences in preserving environmental and ecological resources; and the critical nature of the Earth Sciences to land management at all levels of government.

earth-science-week-2013.jpg

The proclamation will be part of the geologic mapping display now in the lobby of Wells Library, the main library on the Indiana University Campus in Bloomington. The display will be there until after GIS Day on Campus, November 20 - http://gisday.indiana.edu/

For more information about Earth Schience Week 2013 click HERE
Earth as Art. by Lawrence Friedl & Karen Yuen. NASA. 2012. 166p. illus. ISBN 9780160913655. SuDoc# NAS 1.86:NP-2012-07-889-HQ. GPO Stock# 033-000-01358-2. $44 You can download the free PDF Version here:
http://www.nasa.gov/pdf/703154main_earth_art-ebook.pdf
earth-art-1.jpgearth-art-2.jpg
Taken from NASA’s Landsat 7 Earth Observation satellite, the 75 photos in this collection honor the aesthetics of color, shape, and texture created by light and its interplay with water, atmosphere, ice, and landscape.
Are We Losing Our (Spatial) Minds?
Contributed By: Jim Sparks, Indiana Geographic Information Officer
jsparks@iot.in.gov
(317) 234-5889


Recently at Indiana's 2013 Annual GIS Conference I presented the results of some recent research that suggested that plugging into the Internet was “rewiring” our brains with both positive, but mostly negative results. I concluded with a notion, not based on research, that the use of electronic navigation technology was doing something similar to our map minds – our ability to construct a mental model of our spatial world. Many of you agreed.

Now we have some research to back up that suspicion. In “Do our brains pay a price for GPS?” published by the Boston Globe, author Leon Neyfakh reviews research confirming that “When we use GPS… we remember less about the places we go, and put less work into generating our own internal picture of the world.”
gps_man_illo2.jpg - Copyright 2013, The Boston Globe
Copyright 2013, The Boston Globe

Here is the gist of the article published August 18, 2013:
“With the option to use GPS to do our wayfinding for us, it might seem like we don’t have much need for mental maps anymore. But according to Veronique Bohbot, a neuroscientist affiliated with McGill University and the Douglas Institute who studies spatial memory and navigation, the process of generating mental maps also plays a role in activities that have nothing to do with getting to work. Becoming overly reliant on GPS and letting that skill atrophy, she and others suggest, might actually be bad for us. “It’s important for people to take responsibility for their health — including their cognitive health,” said Bohbot. “We can’t just take the back seat.””

And it is not just about losing the practical advantage of a spatial context that is at stake – we may be losing a rich aesthetic element of our world. John Huth, a Harvard physicist wrote in his recently published book “The Lost Art of Finding Our Way,” that by tuning out this geospatial element “You’re losing this chance to have a greater awareness of your environment. It’s almost like depriving yourself of music, or a conversation with another person. There’s a richness that you’re missing out on.”

Does all this mean that we should chuck our GPS units out the car window at the earliest opportunity? Probably not. But we should be conscious of when and how we use this technology (just like when we plug into or off of the Internet), and how it changes the way we think. “One moment … recalculating.”

The link to the full article is: http://www.bostonglobe.com/ideas/2013/08/17/our-brains-pay-price-for-gps/d2Tnvo4hiWjuybid5UhQVO/story.html
Awards for the “Indiana Grant for Innovative Uses of GIS Tools and Data” were given to two Indiana college students this month. The grant, sponsored by the Indiana Space Grant Consortium and IGIC, aims to promote the use of Indiana spatial data among college students to solve real-world problems. Heather Foxx of Indiana State University won for her project “Using IndianaMap Data to Contextualize Urban Soil Lead Variability.” Focusing on the Terre Haute area, Ms. Foxx will collect data on lead content in the soil and analyze it using demographic, infrastructure and environmental data from the IndianaMap. A second award was given to Emily Zeller and Nick Cooper of Indiana University. The two intend to research the using Indiana’s 2013 LiDAR data to estimate wetland locations and boundaries. Both projects exemplify the potential of collaborations between Indiana’s academic and professional geospatial communities.